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Showing posts from 2014

Play Framework Essentials, Learning Scala, and Functional Programming Principles in Scala

I've been really busy over the last six months or so: First, I was a technical editor for Play Framework Essentials. It's a fun book because every example is first shown in Scala and then in Java, which makes it kind of a Rosetta Stone for the two languages. Then, I was a technical editor for Learning Scala. That was a great book! Jason did a great job making a really complex language very approachable. This wasn't the first book I've read on Scala, but it's certainly one of my favorites! Finally, I took Martin Odersky's class on Coursera, Functional Programming Principles in Scala. I really liked that as well because it gave me a much stronger grasp of functional programming fundamentals. Furthermore, I participated in a study group at Twitter, which made the whole experience much more rewarding.My hope is that I'll get to the point where I can teach a few Scala classes at work. Hence, I've been working my butt off two hours a day on BART and a couple hou…

Python: Custom App Labels in Django

Django has had a long-standing missing feature that made it impossible to give your apps friendly names. See #3591 and #14251. Thankfully, this will be fixed in Django 1.7, but switching to the latest version of Django is not an option for me right now. This was making my admin look really ugly because I have app names such as "mps" and "budget_cost_data". Those would show up in random places in the admin as "Mps", "Budget_cost_data", "Budget cost data", etc. What I wanted was "MPS" and "Budget Cost Data".There are many ways to try to solve this problem. You may be able to switch to Django Suit or Grappelli and then use localization to fix it. However, when I tried that approach with Django Suit, the breadcrumbs were still broken.I finally found this snippet which got me started down a viable path. I grabbed a copy of the Django egg I was using, unzipped it, and copied django/contrib/admin/templates/admin to my proj…

A Blog Post on Excel, 4x4s, Moonshots, and General Purpose Software

Using Excel is like driving a 4x4. Writing custom software is like building an interstate freeway.With a modest amount of training, you can do amazing things with a 4x4. You can go to places where there are no roads. If you don't like where you are, you can just as easily drive somewhere new. The downside is that when you're driving off-road, you generally have to drive pretty slowly, and you have to bring your own gas.You do have to be a specialist to build an interstate freeway. In fact, it requires an amazing amount of work from a large number of people. Yet, once it's built, a 100,000 people a day can fly by at 70mph. It offers them tremendous convenience; they don't even need to bring their own gas! On the other hand, a freeway is only useful if it goes in the direction you need to go.Hence, Excel offers tremendous flexibility, whereas custom software offers tremendous convenience. Excel is easy to get started with, but grows unwieldy as you scale the size of your…

Security: Scam Involving the "assoc" Command on Windows

My dad sent me the following:Today I received a call from a Mark Atkison. He claims to be with Windows Technical Services, located in (or on) Brainbridge Island, Washington. Phone number 206-201-2413Mark claims for the last two weeks my computer has been downloading online infections, junk files and miscellaneous viruses. I asked him about my “online ID number” Mark said my “customer license Security Identification number is: 888DCA60-FC0A-11CF-8F0F-[deleted]“. Mark said I could verify this by pressing the Windows key and r at the same time.... That would open a “run box” When the run box opens I was to type ASSOC. When I hit the Windows key + r, I saw a box open with “cmd”... which I figured stands for “command”. If I remember correctly, I erased the “cmd”. I was to type ASSOC. When I did, I saw something come up with “exe”. By the way, when I typed in ASSOC, I would not hit enter. I thought this might be some kink of scam or bull shit. I told Mark I was going to…

Being Turing Complete Ain't All That and a Bag of Chips

I was talking to someone the other day. He said that given two Turing Complete programming languages, A and B, if you can write a program in A, you can write a similar program in B. Is that true? I suspect not.I never took a class on computability theory, but I suspect it only works for a limited subset of programs--ones that only require the features provided by a Turing machine. Let me provide a counterexample. Let's suppose that language A has networking APIs and language B doesn't. Nor does language B have any way to access networking APIs. It's entirely possible for language B to be Turing Complete without actually providing such APIs. In such a case, you can write a program in language A that you can't write in language B.Of course, I could be completely wrong because I don't even understand the definitions fully. Like I said, I've never studied computability theory.

Raspberry Pi: Building an LED Digital Clock

As I mentioned in a previous post, I really enjoyed reading Programming Raspberry Pi: Getting Started with Python. One of the chapters in the book teaches you how to build an LED digital clock. It took some futzing around, but I finally got it done :)The first problem I had was that I didn't know how to solder. My buddy Chris Dudte gave me a kit to learn. I watched a bunch of YouTube videos with the kids in my Raspberry Pi class, and then we put the circuit board together. Problem solved.The next two problems I encountered were with the author's library for talking to the smbus for controlling the LEDs, i2c7segment. One of the problems resulted in my saying quite a few less than charitable words under my breath. The Python code kept giving me the error message "IOError: [Errno 5] Input/output error".I finally figured it out. On line 42 of i2c7segment.py, the code is hardcoded to use smbus.SMBus(0). However, sometimes you need to use smbus.SMBus(1). You can run "…

Best Practices for Software Engineers

As I mentioned in my last blog post, I'm going to be giving my "Best Practices for Software Engineers" talk at both the East Bay Ruby Meetup and at BayPIGgies (the Bay Area Python Interest Group). We're planning on broadcasting the BayPIGgies meeting using a Google+ Hangout on Air. If you're interested, here's the event, and here's the direct YouTube link.Thanks to @nicholsonjf for setting this up!

Best Practices for Software Engineers

I'm going to be giving my talk "Best Practices for Software Engineers" at two different user groups in May:East Bay Ruby MeetupBayPIGgiesHere's the abstract:Being a software engineer requires a lot more than knowing how to write good code.This class covers a wide variety of topics such as making code reviews useful and effective, how to deal with team conflicts, networking in real life, and planning for your career. The goal is to help you not only be a solid asset for your team, but also to be the type of software engineer that others really enjoy working with.I hope to see some of you there!

PyCon Notes: Introduction to SQLAlchemy

At PyCon, Mike Bayer, the author of SQLAlchemy, gave a three hour tutorial on it. Here's the video. What follows are my notes.

He used something called sliderepl. sliderepl is a nice ASCII tool that's a mix of slides and a REPL. You can flip through his source code / slides in the terminal. It's actually pretty neat.

At the lowest level, SQLAlchemy sends strings to the database and interprets the responses.

It took him 10 years to write it. He started the project in 2005. He's finally going to hit 1.0.

SQLAlchemy forces you to be aware of transactions.

Isolation models have to do with how ongoing transactions see ongoing work amongst each other.

Goals:

    Provide helpers, etc.

    Provides a fully featured facade over the Python DBAPI.

    Provide an industrial strength, but optional, ORM.

    Act as a base for inhouse tools.

Philosophies:

    Make the usage of different DBs and adaptors as consistent as possible.

    But still expose unique features in each backend.

PyCon Notes: PostgreSQL Proficiency for Python People

In summary, this tutorial was fantastic! I learned more in three hours than I would have learned if I had read a whole book!

Here's the video. Here are the slides. Here are my notes:

Christoph Pettus was the speaker. He's from PostgreSQL Experts.

PostgreSQL is a rich environment.

It's fully ACID compliant.

It has the richest set of features of any modern, production RDMS. It has even more features than
Oracle.

PostgreSQL focuses on quality, security, and spec compliance.

It's capable of very high performance: tens of thousands of transactions per second, petabyte-sized data sets, etc.

To install it, just use your package management system (apt, yum, etc.). Those systems will usually take care of initialization.

There are many options for OS X. Heroku even built a Postgres.app that runs more like a foreground app.

A "cluster" is a single PostgreSQL server (which can manage multiple databases).

initdb creates the basic file structure. PostgreSQL has to be up a…

Dagger: A Dependency Injection Framework for Android and Java

Dagger is a new dependency injection framework for Android and Java. I went to a meetup yesterday to learn more about it. These are my notes:

The talk was by Jake Wharton who works at Square.

Every single app has some form of DI. You can do DI even if you're not using a library for doing it. The goal of DI is to separate the behavior of something from its required classes. If you've ever used a constructor to receive stuff, you've done a simple version of DI.

Square used Guice heavily.

Problems with Guice:
Config problems fail at runtime.  Slow initialization, slow injection, and memory problems.
These are worse on Android. It causes the OS to load all the code for your app at once. This caused their app to take 2 seconds to start.

They called Dagger "Object Graph" initially.

Goals of Dagger:

Static analysis of all dependencies and injections.  Fail as early as possible--compile time, not runtime. Eliminate the need to do reflection of methods and annotations at …

Books: Two Scoops of Django: Best Practices For Django 1.6

I just finished reading the book Two Scoops of Django: Best Practices For Django 1.6. I had already reviewed the previous edition, so I was anxious to see what had changed. In short, I loved it!It's not an introduction, tutorial, or a reference for Django. In fact, it assumes you've already gone through the Django tutorial, and it occasionally refers you to the Django documentation. Rather, it tells you what you should and shouldn't do to use Django effectively. It's very prescriptive, and it has strong opinions. I've always enjoyed books like that. Best of all, it's only about 400 pages long, and it's very easy to read.This edition is 100 pages longer than the previous edition, and I really enjoyed the new chapters. It has even more silly drawings and creamy ice cream analogies than the original, and even though I'm lactose intolerant, that made the book a lot of fun to read.Having read the book cover-to-cover, even though I'm fairly new to Django,…

Python: A Response to Glyph's Blog Post on Concurrency

If you haven't seen it yet, Glyph wrote a great blog post on concurrency called Unyielding. This blog post is a response to that blog post.Over the years, I've tried each of the approaches he talks about while working at various companies. I've known all of the arguments for years. However, I think his blog post is the best blog post I've read for the arguments he is trying to make. Nice job, Glyph!In particular, I agree with his statements:What I hope I’ve demonstrated is that if you agree with me that threading has problematic semantics, and is difficult to reason about, then there’s no particular advantage to using microthreads, beyond potentially optimizing your multithreaded code for a very specific I/O bound workload.There are no shortcuts to making single-tasking code concurrent. It's just a hard problem, and some of that hard problem is reflected in the difficulty of typing a bunch of new concurrency-specific code.In this blog post, I'm not really dispu…

Python: A lightning quick introduction to virtualenv, nose, mock, monkey patching, dependency injection, and doctest

pippip is a tool for installing Python packages. Python 2.7.9 and later include pip by default. If you don't have pip, you'll need to install it.virtualenvvirtualenv is a tool for installing Python packages locally (i.e. local to a particular project) instead of globally. Here's how to get everything setup: # Make sure you're using the version of Python and pip that you want to use. sudo which python sudo which pip sudo pip install virtualenv Now, let's setup a new project: mkdir ~/Desktop/sfpythontesting cd ~/Desktop/sfpythontesting virtualenv env # Do this anytime you want to work on the application. . env/bin/activate # Make sure that pip is running from within the env. which pip pip install nose pip install mock pip freeze > requirements.txt # Now that you've created a requirements.txt, other people can just run: # pip install -r requirements.txt noseNose is a popular Python testing library. It simple and powerful.Setup the project structure: mkdir …