Monday, March 01, 2010

Python: Is there a Python Toolbox Website?

Is there something like Ruby Toolbox for Python? Unlike PyPI, Ruby Toolbox feels highly curated, which I really, really like. Notice it even has graphs to show you the relative popularities of the various packages.

Half the reason I go to PyCon is so that I can know which libraries are good, and which ones aren't so good. Ruby Toolbox helps me cut to the chase, so it'd be great to find something like that in the Python world too.

7 comments:

Catherine said...

I don't know of one, and it seems like a worthy endeavor. Obviously, it would be an extremely opinionated endeavor... maybe it should be called PyIMHO or something! :)

dads said...

looks good. I'm sure someone from the psf said they had plenty of money (I could be wrong!).

Maybe they should look at getting someone to create something like this, along with a new site. The old one looks very dated.

moreati said...

I'm only aware of the Cheesecake module, but it doesn't appear to publish a public index.

Ben Bangert said...

Using existing popularity is always kind of tricky. It acts as a re-inforcement loop for the existing popular ones, rather than helping you discover what might be a better solution. So 'new' tools that might be better have a hard time competing against existing ones.

A topic that came up at PyCon after Ian's talk on packaging, was having a more highly curated 'stable' set of packages similar to the packaging requirements for debian. Ie, only well tested, well documented code makes it in, which helps to encourage people to write such packages so that they can be accepted into it.

bsergean said...

I'm not sure we need the popularity thing, just sorting by last update (as it's done on PyPI).

Found a VIM PDB integration on PyPI BTW
!
vimpdb

Shannon -jj Behrens said...

I like the fact that Ruby Toolbox provides a graph showing some measure of popularity over time. It's not that I'm always going to pick the most popular option. I want to know how long they've been popular, if they're hot, if they're brand new, etc. Once I get some initial information, I can look to see if I like the individual project. Sometimes even something like bad grammar in the documentation is enough to make me look at another project.

I like the fact that Ruby Toolbox is more "curated" than PyPI.

Venkatraman.S said...

i will try to develop something for Py.