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Ruby: An Introduction to Behavioral Driven Development with RSpec and Cucumber

On October 20, 2009 at 6:30, I'm going to be giving a talk for the East Bay Ruby Meetup Group called "An Introduction to Behavioral Driven Development with RSpec and Cucumber". This is an introduction to behavioral driven development in Rails using Cucumber, RSpec, Webrat, and factory_girl.

For the second time in my life, I finished preparing several days before the actual talk. If you're interested, here are the slides.

Happy testing! :-D

Comments

Mr Darrin Eden said…
I'm glad to see you've fully embraced the dark side. ;-)
Haha. Thankfully, I'm still multilingual. I work at two startups--one Python and one Ruby. I gave two talks this month--one Python and one Ruby ;)
Ben said…
Thanks for this talk! I recommended your slides to some of my former colleagues, because I like your setup and I think you have some good and concise comments on testing in general.
Thanks, Ben!
Andriy Drozdyuk said…
How did the talk go? Did you really present all 75 of the slides? That must have been a very long talk :p

Even though I am a python guy I like the exploratory path you've taken. In particular I would love to have something instead of "fixtures" in django that can make it easier for me to populate the db for testing.

Also liked your discussion on ruby vs. haskel, lack of interfaces and misspellings.

If I may suggest in the future to focus on one particular topic (your presentation seems to go back and forth sometimes). 20 slides should do it ;-)

Also - I am really curious by reading your blog whether you have read Code Complete 2? Either you've read it (in which case great) or you haven't (in which case I think you should) :-)
Hey Andriy,

> How did the talk go? Did you really present all 75 of the slides? That must have been a very long talk :p

The talk went very well. We made it through all the slides, and the questions were pretty good. We had to speed up a bit toward the end, but everyone seemed to really enjoy the talk.

> Even though I am a python guy I like the exploratory path you've taken. In particular I would love to have something instead of "fixtures" in django that can make it easier for me to populate the db for testing.

Yep.

> Also liked your discussion on ruby vs. haskel, lack of interfaces and misspellings.

Thanks.

> If I may suggest in the future to focus on one particular topic (your presentation seems to go back and forth sometimes). 20 slides should do it ;-)

Thanks for the suggestion, but I was actually doing what they asked me to do. They wanted a) an introduction to BDD, RSpec, and Cucumber b) some opinions and advice c) (at least implicitly) an explanation of why they should test. You're right, there are 3 20 minute talks in there, but I only get one shot to talk, and it's for 60 minutes ;) As for 20 slides, I wrote the slides for people like you who couldn't be at the talk. Hence, I went way overboard on purpose. My guess is that more people will read the slides than were actually at the talk.

> Also - I am really curious by reading your blog whether you have read Code Complete 2? Either you've read it (in which case great) or you haven't (in which case I think you should) :-)

I read his other book, "Professional Software Development" (I blogged a summary of it here: http://jjinux.blogspot.com/2006/04/software-engineering-professional.html). I've been hesitant to read "Code Complete" because I read really slowly, and it would take me forever. The massive book I'm committed to right now is "Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming".
Andriy Drozdyuk said…
"I read his other book"
Well the reason I asked is because he explores and presents a lot of facts about testing, and how it is relevant or not. One of the more interesting things for example is that code reviews or pair programming eradicates more bugs than unit testing.

Regarding long read - it reads very easy.
> One of the more interesting things for example is that code reviews or pair programming eradicates more bugs than unit testing.

Yep, he said the same thing in "Profession Software Development". That matches my own experience too, which is why I'm such a fan of code review.

> Regarding long read - it reads very easy.

Okay, okay, I'll put it on my reading list ;)